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Staging Do’s and Don’ts in Selling Real Estate

Posted by on Mar 21, 2014 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Every listing needs staging, not full-blown change out the furniture staging typically (some do) but most just need a little “tweaking.”   Once you live in a home you become so comfortable in your surroundings it’s hard to be objective about how you might improve the design and how your home will best appeal to buyers.

 

 

Bad Staging

Bad Staging

Good staging

Good staging

Staging a property is a move to not only best show off the property’s features but also to create a feeling for potential buyers.  When you can make a potential buyer FEEL comfortable, they may not be able to figure it out but that feeling is the gasoline to drive them to desiring the property and thus making an offer.

Staging is not bringing in masses of fake plants and flowers.  It’s not hanging up mass-produced artwork (usually too high on the wall,) and it’s not  accessories that make no sense (over done table settings in a vacant house, fake bowls of fruit and an open cook book in the kitchen.)

Staging is mainly accessorizing the property.  Staging is the jewelry and make up after putting on the dress.   Good staging makes the property look better, bad staging can make the property look worse.   Sometimes staging is only taking things away…too many accessories, chairs, etc.

Every listing I have, I stage.  Sometimes it’s just changing out the drapes and accessorizing.  The right pillows, drapes, artwork, rugs and accessories can dramatically change the mood of a property.  I typically end up moving down the home owners existing artwork (universally people hang artwork too high,) and adding some art work I bring in.  If flowers and fruit are used, they are always real..scents in the house are important too.  Sometimes I have the home owners paint walls or rooms and sometimes I move furniture or ask them to remove certain pieces.  Often times I “shop” in the house and can use the home owner’s existing items by moving them around to create the look I’m aiming for.

Bad Staging

Bad Staging

Years ago after taking a listing of a home the people had lived in for 20+ years and had not changed, I had them paint and then while they were at work, I came in and moved their furniture, rugs, artwork and brought in some accessories.  I left for the day and let them know I’d be back the following day with the photographer.   I got a very excited call that night from

Good Staging

Good Staging

the homeowners when they returned from work…they never thought about the furniture arrangement or the accessories, rug, artwork placement and they loved it so much, they couldn’t imagine selling.  What works on buyers, worked on them!   It wasn’t the result I was going for but was happy they were happy with their “new” home.

In empty homes sometimes bringing in furniture shows the best use of space.  Often times in homes where there isn’t a dedicated dining room or office, bringing furniture into the space shows (rather than tells) the buyers there is indeed room for both.

Many people aren’t able to visualize an empty house, when staging a property they don’t have to visualize.  What you don’t  want is a property to look like it’s been staged.  If you can tell it’s been staged, it will never have that, “comfortable, desirable,” quality that sells homes.

Staging my listings is an added value for my clients (meaning I don’t charge them for it.)  My job as a listing agent is to bring as much value to the property as I can in order to sell it for the highest sale price.  I invest myself in creating a positive change for the property and it always pays off.

Bad Staging

Bad Staging

If you’re thinking about listing you property, I’d be happy to let you know about the changes I would make in order to create the most appealing “feeling” and sell for the highest price.

 

Good Staging

Good Staging